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Ex-SF Consul-General Jun Paynor, now Ambassador to US

MANILA, August 30, 2016 – During the testimonial dinner at Malakanyang for wounded soldiers, President Rodrigo Duterte announced that Marciano Paynor, Jr. will be replacing Jose Cuisia as the Philippine Ambassador to the United States.

Marciano Paynor

“ConGen Jun” posing at the San Francisco Consulate General of the Philippines (Photo Courtesy: Consulate General of the Philippines in San Francisco)

Baguio-born Marciano A. Paynor, Jr. is a member of the 1971 class of the Philippine Military Academy, and has served as Managing Director of External & Government Relations for Ayala Corporation. Prior his appointment, he has served as Chief Protocol Officer during the regimes of Fidel Ramos, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, and Benigno Aquino, III. The Chief Protocol Officer heads the executive branch agency advising on matters of national and international cultural or diplomatic protocol and procedures. With his background, he was the head organizer of the APEC event in the Philippines last 2015.

Marciano Paynor also served as chief of the Consulate General of the Philippines in San Francisco from 2007-2014.

Soon, he will take office at the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C. and shall head the diplomatic missions of the Philippines in the OFW-heavy global power United States, which also serves as the top diplomatic bureau for Filipinos and international affairs on several other countries in Central America and the Pacific region.

The current diplomatic missions of the Philippines in the United States are:

  1. Embassy of the Philippines, Washington, D.C. (covers Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia; Outside USA: Anguilla, Aruba, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Caribbean Islands (Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies, Cayman Islands, Turks & Caicos), Commonwealth of Jamaica, Country of Curacao, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, Puerto Rico, Republic of Haiti, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maartin, St. Martin, The Territorial Collectivity of St. Barthelemy, Trinidad and Tobago, and U.S. Virgin Islands)
  2. Consulate General of the Philippines in San Francisco (covers Northern California, Northern Nevada, Washington State, Oregon, Montana, Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming and Alaska)
  3. Consulate General of the Philippines in Los Angeles (covers Arizona, Texas, Southern Nevada (Nye, Las Vegas, Clark, Lincoln), New Mexico, Southern California (Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo, Orange, San Diego, Imperial, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Kern)
  4. Consulate General of the Philippines in Honolulu (covers Hawaii, American Samoa, French Polynesia)
  5. Consulate General of the Philippines in Agana (covers Caroline Islands, Guam, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Wake Islands)
  6. Consulate General of the Philippines in Chicago (covers Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wisconsin)
  7. Consulate General of the Philippines in New York (covers Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont)
  8. Consulate General of the Philippines in Saipan (Island of Saipan, The Northern Islands, Tinian, Rota)
  9. Honorary Consulate General of the Philippines in Miami
  10. Honorary Consulate General of the Philippines in Atlanta

Philippine Embassy statistics show a population of almost 38 million Filipinos and the stock estimate of the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration for the number of OFWs in the United States are at around 4 million. As of now, the United States is the country with the most number of OFWs.

With a land area 33 times the size of the Philippines, there are 10 offices across the whole United States.

 

 

 

 

 

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